The D.C. Driver that Stalked Me on my Bike Commute

Last week after work I rode my bike to Georgetown. It was the day after Thanksgiving so the roads were pretty quiet. Still some activity, but not the normal frenetic pace of the workday.

I pedaled to the corner of “S” and Wisconsin, and got in line behind a truck waiting at a stop light. To my right was a parked car that was preparing to leave his parking spot and head out into the street.

Our country has a proud history of respecting the waiting line and looking down on budgers. Because I had gotten there first, the driver had to wait his turn in line and exit his parking spot and turn onto Wisconsin after I did.

The light at the intersection turned green, the truck in front of me entered the intersection to make its left turn, and I made my right turn onto Wisconsin.

As I made my turn, the driver of the car emerging from the parking spot laid on his horn. Geez, I must have really impaired his forward progress from a complete stop with my slow bike (sarcasm). His horn blaring was completely unnecessary. I turned back, looked at him, and raised my left arm in a “What’s up, buddy?” gesture.

In return, the driver lifted both hands off of his steering wheel in agitation and, instead of passing me and going on about his business, proceeded to ride directly behind me.

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Carradice Cheesecake, Weekend Cycling, and Mechanicals

How was your Thanksgiving? In the D.C. area, we were not only treated to a holiday, but also some spectacular late November weather. Sun, light wind, and temperatures in the mid-sixties. At least not all the good weather happens while I’m at work. Here are the weekend highlights from this neck of the woods.

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The Road Less Travelled 130K Populaire on the Rawland dSogn

Over the past weekend, Felkerino and I met up with fellow D.C. Randonneurs Chuck, Crista, and George to ride the recently approved Road Less Travelled Populaire.

This ride, designed by George Moore, totals 130K/83 miles, with approximately 60 percent of featuring unpaved roads. It starts in Haymarket, Virginia, and takes a blend of back roads and pavement to Purcellville, on to Middleburg (the heart of Loudoun County’s horse country), and back again to Haymarket.

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Bikes to Like: Kevin T.’s Rivendell Atlantis

Since we’ve been on the subject of randonneurs and coffeeneurs in Alaska, I thought I’d start out the week with a long overdue Bikes to Like, featuring my flickr friend and RBA of the Alaska Randonneurs, Kevin Turinsky. What kind of bike does this Alaska randonneur choose for the varied conditions Alaska offers? Read on and find out!

Kevin and Atlantis on an S240 (c) Kevin Turinsky

1. What kind of bike do you have?

A 2005 Rivendell Atlantis 61cm.

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Friday Link Love: from Randonneuring to the Commute

CyclingCapTuesday photo by the U.S. Capitol

Another week has rolled by, colder temps have come to Washington, D.C., and all that fall color I raved about is quickly fading or finding its way into the street gutters. That’s ok; we were due, I suppose.

Several stories caught my attention this week. I liked them so much, I thought I’d pass along my week’s reading list to you.

Felkerino, 2010 PA Randonneurs Stillwater 200K

Randonneuring

  • Joe Brown, a randonneur from Pennsylvania, was kind enough to let me feature him on The Daily Randonneur’s Rando Q&A. Good stuff.
  • Joe over at Mellow Yellow wrote up his Flatbread experience, A Windy Day on a Fixie.
  • Joe also has a recent post about his successful pursuit of 10,000 RUSA kilometers in 2011. How did he do it? He explains his methods in his story K-Hounding – the ongoing quest for kilometers.
  • Jack, a Severna Park Peloton rider, put together a good story about his first brevet at Putting it Out There. Title of Jack’s story? First brevet. Seems appropriate.
  • Have you seen this 15-minute PBP 2011 video, Towards the Ocean, by Pete Kelsey? I liked skimming through it. It also includes a dedication to Thai.
  • The Bike Show did a two-part podcast about PBP 2011. The second part includes interviews with Chris Ragsdale, of Seattle, and Judith Swallow. Pete Kelsey, who put together the Towards the Ocean video, is also featured. More perspectives about the PBP experience and how people approach a 1200K. You can find those (free!) via iTunes.
Coffeeneuring

Coffeeneuring

  • Girl on a Bike was one ride away from completing the Coffeeneuring Challenge when Halloween and goth costumes drove her to distraction. I’m categorizing that as an honorable mention. Her fine writeup and photos are shared on her post, Coffeeneuring.
  • Bikes/Bytes/Bites took the coffeeneuring spirit to Brisbane, Australia and wrote about it in Australia Coffeeneuring. Her photos of the adventure are here. At least nine shops visited, and two flat whites consumed. I’ve got to try one of these flat whites!

Commuting

Almost time for the weekend. Let’s bundle up and go ride our bikes!

Coffeeneuring Rewind Part 2: Ted in Alaska

When we last left Ted, he was returning from his third (or fourth, however you might be calculating) coffeeneuring ride on his Long Haul Trucker. Today, we follow our intrepid coffeeneur on the latter half of his coffeeneuring rides, which he attempts to complete riding a different bike each ride. So far, he’s ridden a Gunnar Sport, Surly Long Haul Trucker, and a Giant Kronos. What’s next? Read on and see!

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Coffeeneuring Rewind Part 1: Ted in Alaska

Once again we’re reliving the journey of some of our exceptional coffeeneurs. This week, I’m featuring Ted T., an Alaska randonneur and coffeeneur. Not content to abide by the mere 15 rules of the contest, Ted added an additional criteria for himself: complete each coffeeneuring ride on a different bike. Nice one!

I’ve spent a little time in Alaska, but never studied the number of coffee shops in the area. They have more coffeeneuring destinations than I thought. Read on and take note as Ted shares the first half of his Coffeeneuring Challenge.

I live in Eagle River, Alaska, which is basically a small bedroom community 15 miles from Anchorage. Loving coffee, I couldn’t resist attempting the Coffeeneuring Challenge. I could only come up with four different coffee shops in Eagle River, with another couple of Starbucks located in grocery stores. I figured I could do a couple of trips into Anchorage, but about 10 miles each way is sort of a slog on a bike path along a busy six-lane highway. I ride this frequently when I commute home from work, and really don’t relish doing it again on the weekends.

I ended up with one coffee shop from Anchorage, and then the four in Eagle River along with the two Grocery Store Starbucks. As one of the four in Eagle River is a standalone Starbucks, I realized I was pushing the intent of rule 7, where this is allowed but not preferred. Also, I am a bit of a “friends don’t let friends drink Starbuck’s” type of person. But it was either the Starbucks or 30+ miles treks into Anchorage over that same 20 miles of highway trails.

To make it a bit more interesting for myself and maybe a bit more of a challenge to offset the lack of diversity of coffee shops, I vowed to do each ride on a different bike.

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Weekend Roundup: Two Shorties, a 200K Brevet, and the D.C. Tweed Ride

If you were in the D.C. area over the weekend, you know that we had some choice cycling weather. A pinch brisk in the mornings, giving way to sun and warmth in the afternoon. Long-sleeve, no-jacket temperatures.

With weather like this, who can stay inside? Not me.
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